Nuestros sitios
Ver edición digital Título de la edición actual
Comparte
Compartir

El marketing más allá del binario de género

Marketing Beyond the Gender Binary
Marketers must rethink gender to win the next generations of consumers.

From Philip Morris’s 1954 introduction of the Marlboro Man to promote a “universally masculine appeal” to Dr Pepper Ten’s 2011 launch of a diet soda that was proudly “not for women,” marketers have long capitalized on traditional gender beliefs to sell their products. But now, a decade after Old Spice’s “Smell Like a Man, Man” campaign, brands can no longer rely solely on outdated tropes to connect with increasingly diverse, empowered consumers. Traditional Western views on gender — where people fit neatly into predefined concepts and behaviors of masculinity and femininity — are giving way to inclusivity that allows more individualized and authentic manifestations of gender beyond the binary model.
The winds of change are at our doorstep: According to an Ipsos study in 2019, 34% of all Americans disagreed with the statement that “there are only two genders — male and female — and not a range of gender identities.” Around the world, in 35 countries, 40% disagreed with that binary perspective. Younger consumers are at the vanguard of ushering in change: According to Pew Research, almost 60% of those aged 13 to 21 (“Gen Z”) believe forms that ask about gender should include options besides “male” or “female.”

Older consumers also are no longer locked into binary gender tropes: More than three-quarters of parents look favorably upon encouraging girls to play with toys or participate in activities typically associated with boys.
Marketers Must Ready Their Brands
Astute brands, especially the upstarts, have been quick to perceive and respond to the shift in gender zeitgeist. Women’s shaving brand Billie (recently acquired by Procter & Gamble) satirized how traditional women’s razor brands (many, ironically, also owned by P&G) shied away from showing female body hair. Milk Makeup showcases its products using transgender models as well as cisgender male and female models. Even more indicative of a broader societal and brand strategy shift is that legacy companies, too, have taken bold steps to transcend the binary model of gender, as noted in the examples below.
What is a marketer to do to ready her brand to operate under a different set of gender rules? Using a first-principles approach is the best way to craft a brand strategy along the four axes of marketing:
• Product. Marketers must revisit their product portfolio to assess its relevance to consumers’ shifting expectations. This process has been underway for some time in the personal care category, especially for men’s products, where traditional retailers now stock aisles with products like under-eye and cuticle cream that would have been unimaginable a decade ago. Clothing, especially for children, has evolved for several years with brands like Carter’s, Gap, and H&M offering gender-neutral options. Mattel, often under fire for its overly sexualized Barbie representations, has introduced a gender-neutral doll.
• Pricing. The notorious “pink tax” reflects the higher price women pay for many everyday items; one New York city study pegged it at 13% for personal care items. Burger King’s candid-camera version of selling “chick fries” (the usual chicken fries in a pink box at an inflated price) exposed the absurdity of this price discrimination strategy. Marketers must strip pricing strategies of gender distortion. Online bulk products retailer Boxed took up the challenge to undo gendered pricing, and by March 2019, redistributed $1 million in offset discounts among customers. The brand also sells products like tampons and women’s razors at prices that are cheaper than those of their competitors.
• Promotion. A brand must adapt its communication to both reflect the new thinking about gender and to speak to a society that has shown to have a very different gender identity than in the past. In 2018, Coca-Cola gave a subtle nod to gender-neutral pronouns in its Super Bowl commercial. In an Argentinian ad, the company’s Sprite brand went much further, showing a parent helping a transgender child dress. In the U.K., the Advertising Standards Authority, an independent regulatory body, has established guidelines about perpetuating harmful gender stereotypes and has even banned ads from Volkswagen and Mondelez for violating them.
• Place. The shopping experience, whether it takes place at a physical location or a digital one, is evolving to reflect a new gender reality. Target has always been active in this regard, stripping kids’ toys and bedding sections of gender identifiers. Stockmann, Finland’s largest department store, has an entire floor dedicated to gender-neutral fashion. For online shoppers, Birchbox has changed both how it bundles its products and its website navigation from man/woman to beauty/grooming to reflect choice rather than impose gender expectations.
Brands Must Embrace a New Gender Paradigm
It’s not enough to string together a series of initiatives to tackle gender. And brand building is much more than a tagline and a campaign (often poorly thought through — there’s no brand in the world that wants to replicate Pepsi’s fiasco with their widely condemned ad of Kendall Jenner handing Pepsi to a police officer in the middle of a protest). Bringing pervasive cultural change into your marketing strategy needs to be both relevant and authentic.
Be relevant to the changing needs of your customers. This starts with doing the groundwork on how perceptions are changing, then growing the brand to embrace this evolution, all while continuing to remain useful and meaningful to your core customer. Mastercard’s “True Name” feature — which allows transgender and nonbinary persons to have their true names on their cards without having to go through a legal name change — demonstrates recognition of the importance, and the diversity, of identity. In a similar vein, when booking a flight on United Airlines, customers now have the option to select U (undisclosed) or X (unspecified) as their gender of choice.

Be authentic to your brand essence and credibly demonstrate that you stand by your values. Opportunistic positioning will backfire. The Hallmark Channel ran an ad depicting a lesbian couple, then pulled it in response to complaints from a conservative group. This upset LGBTQ advocacy groups, so Hallmark restored the ad, only to face even harsher criticism from the conservative group. A brand must look within and act on what it believes is right. After coming under evangelical fire for an inclusive bathroom policy, Target, for example, leaned into its commitment to allowing transgender customers to use the bathrooms that match their gender identity by investing $20 million in expanded bathroom options.
Smart Marketing Can Replace Obsolete Gender Proxies
Until now, marketers have been taught not to question the concept of binary gender; it’s firmly programmed into muscle memory. Outdated gender constructs still shape organizational thinking — they’re in our biases, personas, databases, insights, and more. Consider, for example, the volume of market research conducted with strict sampling requirements for male and female respondents, with nary a thought to the explanatory power of the full spectrum of gender.
As data proliferate, marketers grow intimate with every desire of their customers and acquire the behavioral and attitudinal insights to hypercustomize products, services, and experiences. Gender is a proxy, and no marketer should have to build a brand based on guesswork that relies on a faulty construct. Smart marketing is about harnessing the intelligence of data and analytics to build a brand that understands and serves the unique and individual needs of customers, no matter where they identify on the gender spectrum.
ABOUT THE AUTHORS
Dipanjan Chatterjee is a vice president and principal analyst at Forrester Research, where he heads the brand strategy research practice. Nick Monroe is a researcher at Forrester and a doctoral candidate in sociology at Brandeis University.

El marketing más allá del binario de género
Los especialistas en marketing deben repensar el género para ganarse a las próximas generaciones de consumidores.

Desde la introducción de Philip Morris en 1954 del Marlboro Man para promover un “atractivo universalmente masculino” hasta el lanzamiento de un refresco dietético en 2011 de Dr. Pepper TEN que orgullosamente “no era para mujeres”, los especialistas en marketing han aprovechado durante mucho tiempo las creencias tradicionales de género para vender sus productos. Pero ahora, una década después de la campaña “Smell Like a Man, Man” de Old Spice, las marcas ya no pueden confiar únicamente en tropos obsoletos para conectarse con consumidores cada vez más diversos y empoderados. Las visiones occidentales tradicionales sobre el género, donde las personas encajan perfectamente en conceptos y comportamientos predefinidos de masculinidad y feminidad, están dando paso a la inclusión que permite manifestaciones de género más individualizadas y auténticas más allá del modelo binario.

Los vientos de cambio están a nuestras puertas: según un estudio de Ipsos en 2019, el 34% de todos los estadounidenses no estaban de acuerdo con la afirmación de que “solo hay dos géneros, masculino y femenino, y no una variedad de identidades de género”. En todo el mundo, en 35 países, el 40% no estaba de acuerdo con esa perspectiva binaria. Los consumidores más jóvenes están a la vanguardia del cambio: según Pew Research, casi el 60% de los que tienen entre 13 y 21 años (“Generación Z”) creen en formas que preguntan sobre el género deberían incluir opciones además de “masculino” o “femenino”.

Los consumidores mayores tampoco están atrapados en tropos binarios de género: más de las tres cuartas partes de los padres ven con buenos ojos animar a las niñas a jugar con juguetes o participar en actividades típicamente asociadas con los niños.

Los especialistas en marketing deben preparar sus marcas
Las marcas astutas han sido rápidas en percibir y responder al cambio en el zeitgeist de género. La marca de afeitado para mujeres Billie (recientemente adquirida por Procter & Gamble) satirizó cómo las marcas tradicionales de afeitadoras para mujeres (muchas, irónicamente, también son propiedad de P&G) evitan mostrar el vello corporal femenino. Milk Makeup exhibe sus productos utilizando modelos transgénero, así como modelos masculinos y femeninos cisgénero. Aún más indicativo de un cambio de estrategia social y de marca más amplio es que las empresas heredadas también han tomado medidas audaces para trascender el modelo binario de género, como se indica en los ejemplos a continuación.

¿Qué debe hacer un especialista en marketing para preparar su marca para operar bajo un conjunto diferente de reglas de género? Usar un enfoque de primeros principios es la mejor manera de diseñar una estrategia de marca a lo largo de los cuatro ejes del marketing:

• Producto. Los especialistas en marketing deben revisar su portafolio de productos para evaluar su relevancia para las expectativas cambiantes de los consumidores. Este proceso ha estado en marcha durante algún tiempo en la categoría de cuidado personal, especialmente en productos para hombres, donde los minoristas tradicionales ahora almacenan en los pasillos productos como crema para debajo de los ojos y para las cutículas que hubieran sido inimaginables hace una década. La ropa, especialmente para niños, ha evolucionado durante varios años con marcas como Carter’s, Gap y H&M que ofrecen opciones neutrales al género. Mattel, a menudo criticado por sus representaciones de Barbie demasiado sexualizadas, ha presentado una muñeca de género neutro.
• Precio. El notorio “impuesto rosa” refleja el precio más alto que pagan las mujeres por muchos artículos de uso diario; un estudio de la ciudad de Nueva York lo fijó en 13% para artículos de cuidado personal. La versión de cámara honesta de Burger King de vender “papas fritas” (las papas fritas de pollo habituales en una caja rosa a un precio inflado) expuso lo absurdo de esta estrategia de discriminación de precios. Los especialistas en marketing deben eliminar las estrategias de precios de la distorsión de género. El minorista de productos a granel en línea Boxed asumió el desafío de deshacer los precios de género y para marzo de 2019, redistribuyó 1 millón de dólares en descuentos de compensación entre los clientes. La marca también vende productos como tampones y máquinas de afeitar para mujeres a precios más econmicos que los de sus competidores.
• Promoción. Una marca debe adaptar su comunicación tanto para reflejar el nuevo pensamiento sobre el género como para hablar con una sociedad que ha demostrado tener una identidad de género muy diferente a la del pasado. En 2018, Coca-Cola hizo un guiño sutil a los pronombres de género neutro en su comercial del Super Bowl. En un anuncio argentino, la marca Sprite de la compañía fue mucho más allá, mostrando a un padre ayudando a vestirse a un niño transgénero. En el Reino Unido, la Autoridad de Normas de Publicidad, un organismo regulador independiente, ha establecido pautas sobre la perpetuación de los estereotipos de género dañinos e incluso ha prohibido los anuncios de Volkswagen y Mondelez por violarlos.
• Punto de venta. La experiencia de compra, ya sea en un lugar físico o digital, está evolucionando para reflejar una nueva realidad de género. Target siempre ha estado activo en este sentido, eliminando las secciones de juguetes y ropa de cama de los niños de los identificadores de género. Stockmann, la tienda por departamentos más grande de Finlandia, tiene un piso completo dedicado a la moda neutral en cuanto al género. Para los compradores en línea, Birchbox ha cambiado tanto la forma en que agrupa sus productos como la navegación de su sitio web desde hombre/mujer hasta belleza/aseo para reflejar la elección en lugar de imponer expectativas de género.

Las marcas deben adoptar un nuevo paradigma de género
No basta con unir una serie de iniciativas para abordar el género y la construcción de marca es mucho más que un eslogan y una campaña (a menudo mal pensada; no hay marca en el mundo que quiera replicar el fiasco de Pepsi con su anuncio ampliamente condenado de Kendall Jenner entregando Pepsi a un oficial de policía en medio de una protesta). Llevar un cambio cultural generalizado a su estrategia de marketing debe ser relevante y auténtico.

Sé relevante para las necesidades cambiantes de tus clientes. Esto comienza con hacer el trabajo preliminar sobre cómo están cambiando las percepciones y luego hacer crecer la marca para adoptar esta evolución, todo mientras continúa siendo útil y significativo para su cliente principal. La función “True Name” de Mastercard, que permite a las personas transgénero y no binarias tener sus nombres verdaderos en sus tarjetas sin tener que pasar por un cambio de nombre legal, demuestra el reconocimiento de la importancia y la diversidad de la identidad. De manera similar, al reservar un vuelo en United Airlines, los clientes ahora tienen la opción de seleccionar U (no revelado) o X (no especificado) como su género de elección.

Sé auténtico con la esencia de tu marca y demuestra de manera creíble que defiendes tus valores. El posicionamiento oportunista será contraproducente. Hallmark Channel publicó un anuncio que mostraba a una pareja de lesbianas y luego lo retiró en respuesta a las quejas de un grupo conservador. Esto molestó a los grupos de defensa LGBTQ, por lo que Hallmark restauró el anuncio, solo para enfrentar críticas aún más duras del grupo conservador. Una marca debe mirar hacia adentro y actuar de acuerdo con lo que cree que es correcto. Después de estar bajo fuego evangélico por una política de baño inclusivo, Target, por ejemplo, se inclinó hacia su compromiso de permitir que los clientes transgénero usen los baños que coincidan con su identidad de género al invertir 20 millones de dólares en opciones de baño ampliadas.

El marketing inteligente puede reemplazar los sustitutos de género obsoletos
Hasta ahora, a los especialistas en marketing se les ha enseñado a no cuestionar el concepto de género binario; está firmemente programado en la memoria muscular. Las construcciones de género obsoletas todavía dan forma al pensamiento organizacional: están en nuestros prejuicios, personas, bases de datos, conocimientos y más. Considera, por ejemplo, el volumen de investigación de mercado realizada con estrictos requisitos de muestreo para hombres y mujeres encuestados, sin pensar en el poder explicativo del espectro completo de género.

A medida que proliferan los datos, los especialistas en marketing se vuelven más íntimos con todos los deseos de sus clientes y adquieren los conocimientos de comportamiento y actitud para hiperpersonalizar productos, servicios y experiencias. El género es un proxy y ningún especialista en marketing debería tener que construir una marca basada en conjeturas que se basan en una construcción defectuosa. El marketing inteligente se trata de aprovechar la inteligencia de los datos y el análisis para construir una marca que comprenda y atienda las necesidades únicas e individuales de los clientes, sin importar dónde se identifiquen en el espectro de género.

SOBRE LOS AUTORES
Dipanjan Chatterjee es vicepresidente y analista principal de Forrester Research, donde dirige la práctica de investigación de estrategia de marca. Nick Monroe es investigador de Forrester y candidato a doctorado en sociología en la Universidad de Brandeis.


German Sánchez 27 Jul 2021
El marketing más allá del binario de género

Marketing Beyond the Gender Binary
Marketers must rethink gender to win the next generations of consumers.

From Philip Morris’s 1954 introduction of the Marlboro Man to promote a “universally masculine appeal” to Dr Pepper Ten’s 2011 launch of a diet soda that was proudly “not for women,” marketers have long capitalized on traditional gender beliefs to sell their products. But now, a decade after Old Spice’s “Smell Like a Man, Man” campaign, brands can no longer rely solely on outdated tropes to connect with increasingly diverse, empowered consumers. Traditional Western views on gender — where people fit neatly into predefined concepts and behaviors of masculinity and femininity — are giving way to inclusivity that allows more individualized and authentic manifestations of gender beyond the binary model.
The winds of change are at our doorstep: According to an Ipsos study in 2019, 34% of all Americans disagreed with the statement that “there are only two genders — male and female — and not a range of gender identities.” Around the world, in 35 countries, 40% disagreed with that binary perspective. Younger consumers are at the vanguard of ushering in change: According to Pew Research, almost 60% of those aged 13 to 21 (“Gen Z”) believe forms that ask about gender should include options besides “male” or “female.”

Older consumers also are no longer locked into binary gender tropes: More than three-quarters of parents look favorably upon encouraging girls to play with toys or participate in activities typically associated with boys.
Marketers Must Ready Their Brands
Astute brands, especially the upstarts, have been quick to perceive and respond to the shift in gender zeitgeist. Women’s shaving brand Billie (recently acquired by Procter & Gamble) satirized how traditional women’s razor brands (many, ironically, also owned by P&G) shied away from showing female body hair. Milk Makeup showcases its products using transgender models as well as cisgender male and female models. Even more indicative of a broader societal and brand strategy shift is that legacy companies, too, have taken bold steps to transcend the binary model of gender, as noted in the examples below.
What is a marketer to do to ready her brand to operate under a different set of gender rules? Using a first-principles approach is the best way to craft a brand strategy along the four axes of marketing:
• Product. Marketers must revisit their product portfolio to assess its relevance to consumers’ shifting expectations. This process has been underway for some time in the personal care category, especially for men’s products, where traditional retailers now stock aisles with products like under-eye and cuticle cream that would have been unimaginable a decade ago. Clothing, especially for children, has evolved for several years with brands like Carter’s, Gap, and H&M offering gender-neutral options. Mattel, often under fire for its overly sexualized Barbie representations, has introduced a gender-neutral doll.
• Pricing. The notorious “pink tax” reflects the higher price women pay for many everyday items; one New York city study pegged it at 13% for personal care items. Burger King’s candid-camera version of selling “chick fries” (the usual chicken fries in a pink box at an inflated price) exposed the absurdity of this price discrimination strategy. Marketers must strip pricing strategies of gender distortion. Online bulk products retailer Boxed took up the challenge to undo gendered pricing, and by March 2019, redistributed $1 million in offset discounts among customers. The brand also sells products like tampons and women’s razors at prices that are cheaper than those of their competitors.
• Promotion. A brand must adapt its communication to both reflect the new thinking about gender and to speak to a society that has shown to have a very different gender identity than in the past. In 2018, Coca-Cola gave a subtle nod to gender-neutral pronouns in its Super Bowl commercial. In an Argentinian ad, the company’s Sprite brand went much further, showing a parent helping a transgender child dress. In the U.K., the Advertising Standards Authority, an independent regulatory body, has established guidelines about perpetuating harmful gender stereotypes and has even banned ads from Volkswagen and Mondelez for violating them.
• Place. The shopping experience, whether it takes place at a physical location or a digital one, is evolving to reflect a new gender reality. Target has always been active in this regard, stripping kids’ toys and bedding sections of gender identifiers. Stockmann, Finland’s largest department store, has an entire floor dedicated to gender-neutral fashion. For online shoppers, Birchbox has changed both how it bundles its products and its website navigation from man/woman to beauty/grooming to reflect choice rather than impose gender expectations.
Brands Must Embrace a New Gender Paradigm
It’s not enough to string together a series of initiatives to tackle gender. And brand building is much more than a tagline and a campaign (often poorly thought through — there’s no brand in the world that wants to replicate Pepsi’s fiasco with their widely condemned ad of Kendall Jenner handing Pepsi to a police officer in the middle of a protest). Bringing pervasive cultural change into your marketing strategy needs to be both relevant and authentic.
Be relevant to the changing needs of your customers. This starts with doing the groundwork on how perceptions are changing, then growing the brand to embrace this evolution, all while continuing to remain useful and meaningful to your core customer. Mastercard’s “True Name” feature — which allows transgender and nonbinary persons to have their true names on their cards without having to go through a legal name change — demonstrates recognition of the importance, and the diversity, of identity. In a similar vein, when booking a flight on United Airlines, customers now have the option to select U (undisclosed) or X (unspecified) as their gender of choice.

Be authentic to your brand essence and credibly demonstrate that you stand by your values. Opportunistic positioning will backfire. The Hallmark Channel ran an ad depicting a lesbian couple, then pulled it in response to complaints from a conservative group. This upset LGBTQ advocacy groups, so Hallmark restored the ad, only to face even harsher criticism from the conservative group. A brand must look within and act on what it believes is right. After coming under evangelical fire for an inclusive bathroom policy, Target, for example, leaned into its commitment to allowing transgender customers to use the bathrooms that match their gender identity by investing $20 million in expanded bathroom options.
Smart Marketing Can Replace Obsolete Gender Proxies
Until now, marketers have been taught not to question the concept of binary gender; it’s firmly programmed into muscle memory. Outdated gender constructs still shape organizational thinking — they’re in our biases, personas, databases, insights, and more. Consider, for example, the volume of market research conducted with strict sampling requirements for male and female respondents, with nary a thought to the explanatory power of the full spectrum of gender.
As data proliferate, marketers grow intimate with every desire of their customers and acquire the behavioral and attitudinal insights to hypercustomize products, services, and experiences. Gender is a proxy, and no marketer should have to build a brand based on guesswork that relies on a faulty construct. Smart marketing is about harnessing the intelligence of data and analytics to build a brand that understands and serves the unique and individual needs of customers, no matter where they identify on the gender spectrum.
ABOUT THE AUTHORS
Dipanjan Chatterjee is a vice president and principal analyst at Forrester Research, where he heads the brand strategy research practice. Nick Monroe is a researcher at Forrester and a doctoral candidate in sociology at Brandeis University.

El marketing más allá del binario de género
Los especialistas en marketing deben repensar el género para ganarse a las próximas generaciones de consumidores.

Desde la introducción de Philip Morris en 1954 del Marlboro Man para promover un “atractivo universalmente masculino” hasta el lanzamiento de un refresco dietético en 2011 de Dr. Pepper TEN que orgullosamente “no era para mujeres”, los especialistas en marketing han aprovechado durante mucho tiempo las creencias tradicionales de género para vender sus productos. Pero ahora, una década después de la campaña “Smell Like a Man, Man” de Old Spice, las marcas ya no pueden confiar únicamente en tropos obsoletos para conectarse con consumidores cada vez más diversos y empoderados. Las visiones occidentales tradicionales sobre el género, donde las personas encajan perfectamente en conceptos y comportamientos predefinidos de masculinidad y feminidad, están dando paso a la inclusión que permite manifestaciones de género más individualizadas y auténticas más allá del modelo binario.

Los vientos de cambio están a nuestras puertas: según un estudio de Ipsos en 2019, el 34% de todos los estadounidenses no estaban de acuerdo con la afirmación de que “solo hay dos géneros, masculino y femenino, y no una variedad de identidades de género”. En todo el mundo, en 35 países, el 40% no estaba de acuerdo con esa perspectiva binaria. Los consumidores más jóvenes están a la vanguardia del cambio: según Pew Research, casi el 60% de los que tienen entre 13 y 21 años (“Generación Z”) creen en formas que preguntan sobre el género deberían incluir opciones además de “masculino” o “femenino”.

Los consumidores mayores tampoco están atrapados en tropos binarios de género: más de las tres cuartas partes de los padres ven con buenos ojos animar a las niñas a jugar con juguetes o participar en actividades típicamente asociadas con los niños.

Los especialistas en marketing deben preparar sus marcas
Las marcas astutas han sido rápidas en percibir y responder al cambio en el zeitgeist de género. La marca de afeitado para mujeres Billie (recientemente adquirida por Procter & Gamble) satirizó cómo las marcas tradicionales de afeitadoras para mujeres (muchas, irónicamente, también son propiedad de P&G) evitan mostrar el vello corporal femenino. Milk Makeup exhibe sus productos utilizando modelos transgénero, así como modelos masculinos y femeninos cisgénero. Aún más indicativo de un cambio de estrategia social y de marca más amplio es que las empresas heredadas también han tomado medidas audaces para trascender el modelo binario de género, como se indica en los ejemplos a continuación.

¿Qué debe hacer un especialista en marketing para preparar su marca para operar bajo un conjunto diferente de reglas de género? Usar un enfoque de primeros principios es la mejor manera de diseñar una estrategia de marca a lo largo de los cuatro ejes del marketing:

• Producto. Los especialistas en marketing deben revisar su portafolio de productos para evaluar su relevancia para las expectativas cambiantes de los consumidores. Este proceso ha estado en marcha durante algún tiempo en la categoría de cuidado personal, especialmente en productos para hombres, donde los minoristas tradicionales ahora almacenan en los pasillos productos como crema para debajo de los ojos y para las cutículas que hubieran sido inimaginables hace una década. La ropa, especialmente para niños, ha evolucionado durante varios años con marcas como Carter’s, Gap y H&M que ofrecen opciones neutrales al género. Mattel, a menudo criticado por sus representaciones de Barbie demasiado sexualizadas, ha presentado una muñeca de género neutro.
• Precio. El notorio “impuesto rosa” refleja el precio más alto que pagan las mujeres por muchos artículos de uso diario; un estudio de la ciudad de Nueva York lo fijó en 13% para artículos de cuidado personal. La versión de cámara honesta de Burger King de vender “papas fritas” (las papas fritas de pollo habituales en una caja rosa a un precio inflado) expuso lo absurdo de esta estrategia de discriminación de precios. Los especialistas en marketing deben eliminar las estrategias de precios de la distorsión de género. El minorista de productos a granel en línea Boxed asumió el desafío de deshacer los precios de género y para marzo de 2019, redistribuyó 1 millón de dólares en descuentos de compensación entre los clientes. La marca también vende productos como tampones y máquinas de afeitar para mujeres a precios más econmicos que los de sus competidores.
• Promoción. Una marca debe adaptar su comunicación tanto para reflejar el nuevo pensamiento sobre el género como para hablar con una sociedad que ha demostrado tener una identidad de género muy diferente a la del pasado. En 2018, Coca-Cola hizo un guiño sutil a los pronombres de género neutro en su comercial del Super Bowl. En un anuncio argentino, la marca Sprite de la compañía fue mucho más allá, mostrando a un padre ayudando a vestirse a un niño transgénero. En el Reino Unido, la Autoridad de Normas de Publicidad, un organismo regulador independiente, ha establecido pautas sobre la perpetuación de los estereotipos de género dañinos e incluso ha prohibido los anuncios de Volkswagen y Mondelez por violarlos.
• Punto de venta. La experiencia de compra, ya sea en un lugar físico o digital, está evolucionando para reflejar una nueva realidad de género. Target siempre ha estado activo en este sentido, eliminando las secciones de juguetes y ropa de cama de los niños de los identificadores de género. Stockmann, la tienda por departamentos más grande de Finlandia, tiene un piso completo dedicado a la moda neutral en cuanto al género. Para los compradores en línea, Birchbox ha cambiado tanto la forma en que agrupa sus productos como la navegación de su sitio web desde hombre/mujer hasta belleza/aseo para reflejar la elección en lugar de imponer expectativas de género.

Las marcas deben adoptar un nuevo paradigma de género
No basta con unir una serie de iniciativas para abordar el género y la construcción de marca es mucho más que un eslogan y una campaña (a menudo mal pensada; no hay marca en el mundo que quiera replicar el fiasco de Pepsi con su anuncio ampliamente condenado de Kendall Jenner entregando Pepsi a un oficial de policía en medio de una protesta). Llevar un cambio cultural generalizado a su estrategia de marketing debe ser relevante y auténtico.

Sé relevante para las necesidades cambiantes de tus clientes. Esto comienza con hacer el trabajo preliminar sobre cómo están cambiando las percepciones y luego hacer crecer la marca para adoptar esta evolución, todo mientras continúa siendo útil y significativo para su cliente principal. La función “True Name” de Mastercard, que permite a las personas transgénero y no binarias tener sus nombres verdaderos en sus tarjetas sin tener que pasar por un cambio de nombre legal, demuestra el reconocimiento de la importancia y la diversidad de la identidad. De manera similar, al reservar un vuelo en United Airlines, los clientes ahora tienen la opción de seleccionar U (no revelado) o X (no especificado) como su género de elección.

Sé auténtico con la esencia de tu marca y demuestra de manera creíble que defiendes tus valores. El posicionamiento oportunista será contraproducente. Hallmark Channel publicó un anuncio que mostraba a una pareja de lesbianas y luego lo retiró en respuesta a las quejas de un grupo conservador. Esto molestó a los grupos de defensa LGBTQ, por lo que Hallmark restauró el anuncio, solo para enfrentar críticas aún más duras del grupo conservador. Una marca debe mirar hacia adentro y actuar de acuerdo con lo que cree que es correcto. Después de estar bajo fuego evangélico por una política de baño inclusivo, Target, por ejemplo, se inclinó hacia su compromiso de permitir que los clientes transgénero usen los baños que coincidan con su identidad de género al invertir 20 millones de dólares en opciones de baño ampliadas.

El marketing inteligente puede reemplazar los sustitutos de género obsoletos
Hasta ahora, a los especialistas en marketing se les ha enseñado a no cuestionar el concepto de género binario; está firmemente programado en la memoria muscular. Las construcciones de género obsoletas todavía dan forma al pensamiento organizacional: están en nuestros prejuicios, personas, bases de datos, conocimientos y más. Considera, por ejemplo, el volumen de investigación de mercado realizada con estrictos requisitos de muestreo para hombres y mujeres encuestados, sin pensar en el poder explicativo del espectro completo de género.

A medida que proliferan los datos, los especialistas en marketing se vuelven más íntimos con todos los deseos de sus clientes y adquieren los conocimientos de comportamiento y actitud para hiperpersonalizar productos, servicios y experiencias. El género es un proxy y ningún especialista en marketing debería tener que construir una marca basada en conjeturas que se basan en una construcción defectuosa. El marketing inteligente se trata de aprovechar la inteligencia de los datos y el análisis para construir una marca que comprenda y atienda las necesidades únicas e individuales de los clientes, sin importar dónde se identifiquen en el espectro de género.

SOBRE LOS AUTORES
Dipanjan Chatterjee es vicepresidente y analista principal de Forrester Research, donde dirige la práctica de investigación de estrategia de marca. Nick Monroe es investigador de Forrester y candidato a doctorado en sociología en la Universidad de Brandeis.



DESCARGAS